Insights

“Technology as a service” providers vs. flaming buses

Is “technology as a service” going to save the water industry? From a venture capital investor’s point of view, making the model work is essential to accelerating the uptake of new technology in the industry, but from a utility’s point of view, it is difficult to consider propositions which don’t fit the existing procurement model.

I was ...

Will there be a coup at Veolia next Wednesday?

This week, the French press has been alive with rumours that former Veolia boss Henri Proglio has been plotting with President Nicolas Sarkozy to replace the company’s current CEO Antoine Frérot with former environment minister Jean-Louis Borloo. It seems that Proglio, who is now CEO of EDF, does not like the way in which his legacy at Veolia ...

A brave new world of water

Most people in the water industry will probably not recognise the name Craig Venter, but I am very excited that we have been able to secure him to speak at the Global Water Summit in Rome on 30th April. He is not a retired statesman or a water industry leader. He is a geneticist. And then some. He is the ...

What happened to municipal water reuse?

Three years ago, in 2009, we published our Municipal Water Reuse Markets report in collaboration with Singapore’s PUB. It was a big undertaking – we collected information on around 5,000 water reuse projects around the world, and investigated the outlook for the technology in 23 global markets in a 446-page document. The conclusion was that although reuse was a ...

The water sector and the Bengal famine of 1943

Are we seeing the current water challenges correctly? It is a question raised by a paper published this week by Aquafed’s Gérard Payen (you can find the link at www.aquafed.org). In the paper, he suggests that the world’s drinking water deficit is dramatically larger than the progress towards the Millennium Development Goal for water might ...

Asset owners beat the French in 2011. What’s next?

We have been working on our 2011 stock performance review for this month’s magazine. It does not make a pretty picture. 2011 was a bad year for all stocks, but certain water companies were hammered more heavily than the market in general. Specifically, the two biggest water companies in the world, Suez Environnement and Veolia Environnement, fell by 42 ...