Insights

Ten things I learned in Seville

1) The water business is getting more global
Delegate numbers at the event were 22% above last year’s Global Water Summit. That says to me that the market is becoming global at a faster rate than it is actually growing.

2) Latin America is the new Middle East
At each of our six previous conferences, the region of the world which has attracted the most delegate...

Which water technologies would you kill to own?

There is a slightly unnerving story in this month’s GWI about how Israel’s new water technology sector has grown faster than investor interest in it. It seems that around 130 start-ups have been looking for money but local investors think that they can get better returns elsewhere.

Our data suggests that globally, investment in water technology start ups has...

Why is this the last issue of American Water Intelligence in print?

When we launched American Water Intelligence back in October 2010, there were two different needs we wanted to address. The first was the need for a decent publication covering the business side of the North American water sector. There are plenty of product-led or technical titles, but nothing like GWI that talks about water as a business. The second un-met need we...

Dump Veolia: a nasty reminder of 21st century sales

Last week Veolia took a hit from the left field in St. Louis. It had won a competitive tender at the end of last year for a $250,000, four-month consulting contract which should have been the prelude to a longer-term performance-based contract with the utility. Then after a campaign by local Palestinian activists, they were told that the deal is on hold.

Palestinian...

The product is not the product: it is the marketing

Are water technology start-ups sufficiently customer-focused? It seems to me that this is the biggest problem for most of them, but not in the normal sense. Most of them are reasonably in touch with what the people who might buy their equipment want out of a new technology, but that is not the point.

The real customers of start-up companies are not the people who buy...

How will the military drive the water market in the near term?

The U.S. military has a reputation for inventing highly innovative products and systems for its own purposes, which are sometimes adapted for civilian use at a later date. Nuclear power plants, microwave ovens, the Internet, high-definition TV and personal GPS systems are but just a few examples. Recent evidence suggests the military’s forward thinking could soon...