Insights

Can water solve America’s public pensions crisis?

For years American cities have been adding hidden liabilities to their balance sheets in the form of pension commitments. At the same time, the same cities have been adding hidden assets by understating the value of their water systems. Isn’t it time to match the two up and solve the problem?

Take the city of Philadelphia for example. It ...

Does Orège break the rules for water start-ups?

The Orège IPO which priced today at €3.24 is one of the greatest votes of confidence in new water technologies in the past five years. The company, which made a loss of €2.4 million on revenues of €1.1 million in 2012, will start trading on the Paris NYSE Euronext exchange tomorrow with a market capitalisation of ...

What is the German for transparency?

The European Commission performed a curious U-turn last Friday on its proposed directive on concessions. The idea of the directive is to create a common framework for outsourced public services. Originally it was meant to cover all sectors including water, which represents nearly half of all concession-type contracts in Europe. On 21 June, the commissioner responsible, Michel Barnier, changed his ...

New applications underscore desal’s long term growth

The desalination market has been a tough place these last few years. 2012 was the most difficult year for the market since 2004. It will take until 2015 for new desal plant orders to reach the levels they were at in 2007. But despite these difficulties, a lot is changing beneath the surface.

During the boom years the main focus ...

Can water continue to outperform? Ask Veolia

Sometimes the stock market rises because investors anticipate growth. Sometimes it rises simply because the money has nowhere else to go. The latter explanation seems to fit the mood of the market today. What does it mean for water?

There are two main reasons why money has been running out of options of late. The first is because the anticipation ...

Tex-Nex on the menu as growth drives water and power demand

The water-energy nexus is coming to Texas. 30 months of drought have collided with an oil-driven economic boom, and money will need to be spent on water as a result.

It started with the shale: first gas, then oil. The economy – and the population – started to grow faster. As North American energy independence drew closer, Texans started to talk about ...