Insights

The future is temporary

In ten years’ time, will we still be building water infrastructure for 100 years? I started to wonder about this after seeing the Chart of the Month in the May issue of GWI. It suggests that demand forecasting in the water sector is stupidly inaccurate. Models are constructed on the basis of projected population growth and industrial expansion, only to be proved...

What does $100 crude and $4 gas mean for water?

I have been at the Ontario Water Summit this week. It was well attended, and will certainly help make the connection between the province and water technology, but I found myself talking a lot more about gas than water at the event. It seems that excitement about shale gas is straying towards heresy. People are beginning to say that there is so much gas around, that...

From the Editor

At the recent water rights conference in Santa Barbara on April 29th, one of the liveliest debates revolved around how to ensure a reliable water supply for California. While desalination, conservation and water transportation were all discussed, everyone involved agreed that reusing water will feature prominently for California.

Just how this would work was another...

Utah tar sands

For those worried about the day when the oil wells run dry, the potential for oil extraction from the Utah tar sands looks like a bright opportunity. The oil sands in Canada have become one of the richest supplies of oil in the world and have raised interest in U.S. deposits. As companies eye potential opportunities in Utah, which contains the largest U.S. tar sands,...

The tantalising prospect of export growth

We were awarded the Queen’s Award for Enterprise in the international trade category this week. It is something that the British government does to encourage exporters, and involves a visit to Buckingham Palace and the right to use the Queen’s Award logo on our stationery.

Needless to say it does not mean much to our readers because 95% of you are outside...

Water meets money meets street protest

GWI’s Global Water Summit in Berlin earlier this week hit the big time. We attracted a street protest. It may have been quite small (only about 20 people) and well behaved (there were three policemen but no tear gas), but it puts our event right up there with the G8, the World Economic Forum and Bilderberg.

It seems that the thing which they were most excited...